30th Anniversary Appeal: Our Difference

30 years ago, two mothers came together with a vision of a brighter and more understanding future for their sons. They’d met at a physiotherapy group for what was then known as ‘clumsy children’ discovering they both had motor development difficulties, but without a clear reason or diagnosis. After later being told that their children had dyspraxia, they were saddened to discover that no facilities existed to help or inform parents about the condition.

30 years later, the Dyspraxia Foundation remains the UK’s only registered charity dedicated to supporting people of all ages with dyspraxia and is regularly consulted by education and health professionals.

Our core values remain the same – to help, support and inform those with or associated with dyspraxia, and a great deal of this is carried out by volunteers. Thousands and thousands of people live with dyspraxia, sometimes unknowingly as the condition is still frequently misunderstood, and the challenges it can cause are sometimes greatly underestimated.

Demand for our services is increasing, and at the heart of what we do, we aspire for a world in which all those affected by dyspraxia/DCD are enabled to achieve their full potential in life and contribute fully to society. We’re doing all that we can to achieve this and here’s how:

  • We offer a dedicated helpline service manned by trained volunteers every day of the week, answering approximately 10,000 enquiries each year
  • We publish a range of guides and distribute more than 20,000 leaflets each year – further enhancing others’ understanding of what dyspraxia/DCD actually is, how it can affect daily life, and how it can be a strength rather than a weakness
  • We run a number of conferences and workshops, bringing likeminded people together – often it is the first time that a person with dyspraxia/DCD has met someone else with the condition
  • We support a network of local groups throughout the UK – these friendly and informal events are often the first step to finding out more about our work and seeking our help – so often it is described as a “lifeline”
  • We support a network of groups for both adults and young people who live with dyspraxia/DCD – creating conversation, friendship, reducing isolation and offering a safe and supportive environment, online and offline.

You’ll be helping us to help more people like *insert story of a teenager*

You’ll be helping us to help more people like *insert story of a young adult*

You’ll be helping us to help more people like *insert story of two parents*

You’ll be helping us to help more people like *insert story of a teacher*